Study: DevOps Outsourcing Can Cost You

The new report by DORA on the state of DevOps in 2018 found outsourcing to be the crutch of low software delivery performers.

The DevOps Research and Assessment (DORA), which is a collaborative effort between DevOps experts Dr. Nicole Forsgren, Gene Kim, and Jez Humble, has released its 2018 State of DevOps report. This report is released annually and is in its fifth year. The researchers use cluster analysis, which allows readers to compare their performance to their rubric of software delivery performance, which categorizes performers as elite, high, medium, and low.

This year the report looked at the outsourcing of IT and software delivery functions, among other metrics, and how it affected software delivery performance.

The survey showed that functional outsourcing (one role as opposed to an entire process) had a negative impact on performance.

“Low-performing teams are 3.9 times more likely to use functional outsourcing (overall) than elite performance teams, and 3.2 times more likely to use outsourcing of any of the following functions: application development, IT operations work, or testing and QA. This suggests that outsourcing by function is rarely adopted by elite performers. ” — Accelerate: State of DevOps report.

“[Functional outsourcing has] been a common barrier to the adoption of DevOps,” says Jez Humble, CTO and founder of DORA. “We see teams all the time [say], ‘We’d like to do DevOps, but we have functional outsourcing…so it’s impossible to collaborate,’” says Humble, adding that he was glad to see that what they are hearing in the field was strongly confirmed in the data.

According to the report, one reason why outsourcing negatively affects software delivery and operational performance (SDO) is that outsourcing often results in batch software updates, which can lead to longer lead times.

When high-value features are batched with low-value features, there can be significant costs to the business.

(Image: Shutterstock)

The report provides an example from shipping company, Maersk Line. The top three features had a cost of delay of around $7 million per week or $30 million per month. At that rate, the cost to delay features would pale in comparison to the cost savings of outsourcing.

When it comes to outsourcing, Humble says it doesn’t have to be a cost drain, but it needs to be properly evaluated. “Consider [outsourcing] holistically, consider the economics holistically, and find out if it really is the benefit you expect.”

The expectation of simple experiences along with the preference of mobile devices is changing what consumers and businesses expect and need.

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While functional outsourcing does seem to have a significant negative outcome on SDO, it’s not the only factor that impacts SDO. For example, the research also found that the way cloud infrastructure is implemented also had an impact.

According to NIST, and as documented in the report, there are five essential characteristics of cloud computing: on-demand self-service, broad network access, resource pooling, rapid elasticity, measured service.

“Even though over 80% of people said they were using cloud, only 22% of respondents said they were met all five of these essential characteristics, and then when we do the math on it, we found that if you meet all of those [cloud] characteristics, you’re 23 times more likely to be in elite performance group,” says Humble.

One more key takeaway from the report was that the research showed that high performance is not only for the small, nimble, and unregulated industries. It’s industry- and company-size agnostic.

“Anyone can do this,” this being high software delivery performance, says Humble. “We find highly regulated, big companies in our high performers, we find small non-regulated companies in our low performers. We don’t find any statistically significant difference between different verticals on software delivery performance,” says Humble, although he adds that it is hard work.

Source: informationweek.com-Study: DevOps Outsourcing Can Cost You

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Outsourcing DevOps? Here’s What to Look For – DevOps.com

DevOps synthesizes methods, processes and tools with the goal of improving your company’s velocity at which you deploy applications, which serves your customers better. Teams using DevOps best practices and tools to create production software are much faster than organizations using traditional infrastructure management and software development methods. In 2016, RightScale’s “State of the Cloud Report” estimated that 70 percent of SMBs were adopting DevOps methods. Every indication is that percentage has increased.

For companies that already understand the value of software development outsourcing, partnering with a capable outsourcing vendor for DevOps is a natural next step. For companies who want to embrace the benefits of DevOps but haven’t yet, aligning with a qualified DevOps outsourcing company is really worth considering.

Consideration No. 1: Pick the Right Project

If DevOps is new to your company, or the DevOps partner is new to your company—or both—it’s very important to pick the right project to begin work together. Also, it’s possible that the project you target will influence the selection of your DevOps outsourcing partner.

Here are some questions you may want to use in selecting the right project:

This question…. is important because… Which software, if successful, will show the clearest benefit (i.e.: ROI) to the company? Software with clear business benefit will generally get better buy-in from the user community, and higher quality participation. Which software has the clearest goals and scope of work? It’s always easier to achieve the goal, when the goal is clear. Do any projects require the use of new, unproven technology? Unfamiliar technology can be a dangerous variable in your work and risk estimates. How many other systems will the newly completed software need to integrate with? Integration testing is time-consuming and requires a high levels of coordination. Which projects are expected to have the longest duration? Unforeseen variables naturally occur in long running projects — personnel changes, other business distractions, loss of momentum, etc. Which projects are expected to require the largest number of participants? More people involved equals more complexity. What employees (IT and business stakeholders) will be part of the projects? DevOps requires good collaboration and speed. IT and business area participants must be able to fulfill their roles accordingly.

Consideration No. 2: Vendor Communication

In selecting the right outsourcing DevOps partner, the ability to communicate well is one of the most important considerations. A partner who communicates poorly can derail a relationship that has all the right methods and tools in place for success. design iterations and project sprints simply cannot happen if your outsourcing partner lacks the proper communication skills. Conversely, an outsourcing vendor who is truly acting like a partner in the relationship, communicating well and often, can help you overcome any number of unforeseen issues along the way.

Evaluate how well prospective vendors respond to your due diligence questions. Their responses could tell you a lot about how they’ll interact with you during the project. Are they clear? Do they interact in professional ways, or does it seem a bit random and disorganized? Are they prompt and timely in their interactions, or are there “black holes of silence”?

If you see evidence of poor communication during the due diligence process, you’ll almost certainly have problems when you’re actually engaged in working together. As you check references, try to determine if other customers experienced problems in communication and interaction—those can pose as red flags when it comes to selecting your vendor.

Consideration No. 3: Vendor Location

Global software development outsourcing is a proven success for many companies. However, you must be attuned to the vendor’s geographic location compared to yours. Would time zone differences be an issue? This may affect the geographic location from which you’ll select your outsourced DevOps team. In a recent survey, one-third of U.S. companies that outsourced to India considered the 10-hour (or more) time difference to be a big challenge. DevOps activities cannot be artificially hampered because of time zone issues. The best DevOps outsourcing companies have a business model that allows U.S. time zone companies to interact easily with the vendor’s “A team” supporting your project. Be wary of companies that assume that all Skype and conference calls will be done off-hours to your normal business day—or plan to have secondary members of their team available during your normal work hours.

Consideration No. 4: Vendor Technical Skills

As you examine a prospective outsourcing DevOps partners technical capabilities, consider these questions:

  • Do they have the relevant skills and tools experience I need?
  • Is this a core competency of the company, or the expertise of a small select few inside the company?
  • How does this company go about attracting new talent with these same skills?
  • What certifications do they hold?

Automation of good process makes it possible to eliminate bottlenecks in the software development cycle, so you can truly “sprint through your Sprints.” Automation tools must be used with consistency by you and your outsourcing DevOps partner. Perform an inventory of the available tools:

  • Will you be able to seamlessly (and automatically) promote code?
  • Can you perform test-driven design?
  • Can you perform test-driven development?
  • Can you easily associate features and fixes with promoted code?
  • How will you perform regression testing?

DevOps teams will have programming language expertise that includes Python, Ruby, PHP and Java. Remember: DevOps means infrastructure as well as applications, so a true DevOps outsourcing company will have employees with expertise in infrastructure-oriented software and tools such as Windows PowerShell, Docker, Puppet, Ansible and SaltStack. You may also want to look for expertise and certifications for networks, databases, and operating systems.

DevOps outsourcing companies should be experienced with the continuous integration (CI) method—the CI tools which support the associated processes. CI tools help merge source code updates from all developers on a specific software build, notifying the team of any failures in the process. Popular CI Tools include CruiseControl, Jenkins, Travis CI, TeamCity and GitLab.

The best partners employ a programming staff that have achieved certifications that are important for your DevOps project needs. In addition to certifications around the tools and language mentioned earlier (such as Puppet Certification, for example), you will want to look for certifications in:

Consideration No. 5: Vendor Commitment to Training

As you evaluate a prospective DevOps outsourcing company, ask yourself: Is continuous training a part of their business model? A good partner invests in their programming staff’s training on a continual basis. We like to see evidence that their programming staff regularly renews their certifications—and the outsourcing company should be actively advocating this.

Consideration No. 6: Vendor Experience and Size

To succeed with DevOps outsourcing, you need a partner who has relevant experience and is a size that complements your company size.

Experience. The ideal DevOps outsourcing team will have experience in your business vertical (example: discrete manufacturing, banking, etc.). It also should have expertise in the system functional area of your target project (e.g. finance, e-business order processing, warehouse management, etc.). Of course, the demonstrable experiences should include work using Agile and DevOps techniques.

Size. The right partner should be neither too large nor too small. The outsourcing company needs a pool of programmers large enough to keep with the intended work pace of your project. Conversely, we caution IT managers to be wary of extremely large outsourcing companies. Your project and company must be “big enough to matter” to the partner you select. If you are seen as too small in terms of the revenue opportunity, the outsourcing company will defer attention and their top talent to larger customers who are more able to influence decision-making.

 

Source: Devops.com-Outsourcing DevOps? Here’s What to Look For

Outsourcing DevOps? Here’s What to Look For – DevOps.com

DevOps synthesizes methods, processes and tools with the goal of improving your company’s velocity at which you deploy applications, which serves your customers better. Teams using DevOps best practices and tools to create production software are much faster than organizations using traditional infrastructure management and software development methods. In 2016, RightScale’s “State of the Cloud Report” estimated that 70 percent of SMBs were adopting DevOps methods. Every indication is that percentage has increased.

For companies that already understand the value of software development outsourcing, partnering with a capable outsourcing vendor for DevOps is a natural next step. For companies who want to embrace the benefits of DevOps but haven’t yet, aligning with a qualified DevOps outsourcing company is really worth considering.

Consideration No. 1: Pick the Right Project

If DevOps is new to your company, or the DevOps partner is new to your company—or both—it’s very important to pick the right project to begin work together. Also, it’s possible that the project you target will influence the selection of your DevOps outsourcing partner.

Here are some questions you may want to use in selecting the right project:

This question…. is important because… Which software, if successful, will show the clearest benefit (i.e.: ROI) to the company? Software with clear business benefit will generally get better buy-in from the user community, and higher quality participation. Which software has the clearest goals and scope of work? It’s always easier to achieve the goal, when the goal is clear. Do any projects require the use of new, unproven technology? Unfamiliar technology can be a dangerous variable in your work and risk estimates. How many other systems will the newly completed software need to integrate with? Integration testing is time-consuming and requires a high levels of coordination. Which projects are expected to have the longest duration? Unforeseen variables naturally occur in long running projects — personnel changes, other business distractions, loss of momentum, etc. Which projects are expected to require the largest number of participants? More people involved equals more complexity. What employees (IT and business stakeholders) will be part of the projects? DevOps requires good collaboration and speed. IT and business area participants must be able to fulfill their roles accordingly.

Consideration No. 2: Vendor Communication

In selecting the right outsourcing DevOps partner, the ability to communicate well is one of the most important considerations. A partner who communicates poorly can derail a relationship that has all the right methods and tools in place for success. design iterations and project sprints simply cannot happen if your outsourcing partner lacks the proper communication skills. Conversely, an outsourcing vendor who is truly acting like a partner in the relationship, communicating well and often, can help you overcome any number of unforeseen issues along the way.

Evaluate how well prospective vendors respond to your due diligence questions. Their responses could tell you a lot about how they’ll interact with you during the project. Are they clear? Do they interact in professional ways, or does it seem a bit random and disorganized? Are they prompt and timely in their interactions, or are there “black holes of silence”?

If you see evidence of poor communication during the due diligence process, you’ll almost certainly have problems when you’re actually engaged in working together. As you check references, try to determine if other customers experienced problems in communication and interaction—those can pose as red flags when it comes to selecting your vendor.

Consideration No. 3: Vendor Location

Global software development outsourcing is a proven success for many companies. However, you must be attuned to the vendor’s geographic location compared to yours. Would time zone differences be an issue? This may affect the geographic location from which you’ll select your outsourced DevOps team. In a recent survey, one-third of U.S. companies that outsourced to India considered the 10-hour (or more) time difference to be a big challenge. DevOps activities cannot be artificially hampered because of time zone issues. The best DevOps outsourcing companies have a business model that allows U.S. time zone companies to interact easily with the vendor’s “A team” supporting your project. Be wary of companies that assume that all Skype and conference calls will be done off-hours to your normal business day—or plan to have secondary members of their team available during your normal work hours.

Consideration No. 4: Vendor Technical Skills

As you examine a prospective outsourcing DevOps partners technical capabilities, consider these questions:

  • Do they have the relevant skills and tools experience I need?
  • Is this a core competency of the company, or the expertise of a small select few inside the company?
  • How does this company go about attracting new talent with these same skills?
  • What certifications do they hold?

Automation of good process makes it possible to eliminate bottlenecks in the software development cycle, so you can truly “sprint through your Sprints.” Automation tools must be used with consistency by you and your outsourcing DevOps partner. Perform an inventory of the available tools:

  • Will you be able to seamlessly (and automatically) promote code?
  • Can you perform test-driven design?
  • Can you perform test-driven development?
  • Can you easily associate features and fixes with promoted code?
  • How will you perform regression testing?

DevOps teams will have programming language expertise that includes Python, Ruby, PHP and Java. Remember: DevOps means infrastructure as well as applications, so a true DevOps outsourcing company will have employees with expertise in infrastructure-oriented software and tools such as Windows PowerShell, Docker, Puppet, Ansible and SaltStack. You may also want to look for expertise and certifications for networks, databases, and operating systems.

DevOps outsourcing companies should be experienced with the continuous integration (CI) method—the CI tools which support the associated processes. CI tools help merge source code updates from all developers on a specific software build, notifying the team of any failures in the process. Popular CI Tools include CruiseControl, Jenkins, Travis CI, TeamCity and GitLab.

The best partners employ a programming staff that have achieved certifications that are important for your DevOps project needs. In addition to certifications around the tools and language mentioned earlier (such as Puppet Certification, for example), you will want to look for certifications in:

Consideration No. 5: Vendor Commitment to Training

As you evaluate a prospective DevOps outsourcing company, ask yourself: Is continuous training a part of their business model? A good partner invests in their programming staff’s training on a continual basis. We like to see evidence that their programming staff regularly renews their certifications—and the outsourcing company should be actively advocating this.

Consideration No. 6: Vendor Experience and Size

To succeed with DevOps outsourcing, you need a partner who has relevant experience and is a size that complements your company size.

Experience. The ideal DevOps outsourcing team will have experience in your business vertical (example: discrete manufacturing, banking, etc.). It also should have expertise in the system functional area of your target project (e.g. finance, e-business order processing, warehouse management, etc.). Of course, the demonstrable experiences should include work using Agile and DevOps techniques.

Size. The right partner should be neither too large nor too small. The outsourcing company needs a pool of programmers large enough to keep with the intended work pace of your project. Conversely, we caution IT managers to be wary of extremely large outsourcing companies. Your project and company must be “big enough to matter” to the partner you select. If you are seen as too small in terms of the revenue opportunity, the outsourcing company will defer attention and their top talent to larger customers who are more able to influence decision-making.

Source: DevOps.com-Outsourcing DevOps? Here’s What to Look For

Software Development Outsourcing

What if they outsourced The Phoenix Project?

Using one or more outsourcing partners who are experts in the technologies, methodologies and best practices of UX design and DevOps is the fastest way to make a rapid digital transformation of your business.

 

The award-winning book, The Phoenix Project, tells the all too familiar story of a business-critical software development project gone bad. With 200 developers and after $20M invested, the project is two years behind schedule. What a nightmare for the VP of application development. It’s no wonder that halfway through the book, company management threatens to outsource all of IT.

While the book’s main theme is how development and operations must work closely together to be successful (aka DevOps), personally, I wondered what’s the company been doing with 200 developers for two years that resulted in little or no progress?

My opinion? They should have outsourced from the beginning.

The fictional company Parts Unlimited could have radically and positively changed the course of The Phoenix Project by outsourcing to an expert software development partner. Here are a few of the gains they could have experienced:

Rapid digital transformation

Most companies have strategic initiatives like Phoenix to get their businesses online, and just like Parts Unlimited, they don’t have the proper IT culture to succeed. Phoenix was plagued by project delays that put the project two years behind schedule. The primary contributing factor was the attempt to use a traditional slow-speed IT organization culture focused on maintaining payroll and inventory systems to simultaneously take on creating a fast-speed customer-facing software application. Outsourcing the fast speed of two-speed IT to one or more outsourcing partners with the specific skills needed would have solved this problem.

Outsourcing accelerates the transition to a two-speed model. The agile culture required to think of software as a product with a continuous feedback/improvement loop is achieved much more easily in an outsourced software development shop that is an expert at product development, rather than building a “fast” IT team and culture in a historically “slow” IT organization.

Handy tip: Using one or more outsourcing partners who are experts in the technologies, methodologies and best practices of UX design and DevOps is the fastest way to make a rapid digital transformation of your business.

Access to innovation

Several new technologies have become popular in the nearly four years since The Phoenix Project was published:

  • Responsive design
  • Elastic search
  • Angular and React (often replacing JQuery)
  • Spark (for stream processing of analytics data)

A good software outsourcing partner would have introduced the latest trends in software development to The Phoenix Project. How about Augmented Reality features to help Parts Unlimited customers identify the part they need to replace?

Handy tip: Technical expertise is one of the top criteria for selecting an outsourcing development partner. You’ll want to choose a team that’s on top of the latest software development trends and has a successful track record developing software apps for other clients similar to you.

Tap world-class talent

Parts Unlimited could have tapped large pools of professional, capable, English-speaking software development teams all over the world. In my experience, a public company like Parts Unlimited would have been tempted to hire a team as large as 100 developers. But they would be wrong.

Even at $20M, a deal this size is small to a large software development outsourcing company, and it’s unlikely Parts Unlimited will get the attention they need.

For a team of 100 developers, Parts Unlimited needs its outsourcing partner company size to be between 500 and 2,000 developers. And they should focus on the smaller end of the range, because they’ll start small and may never reach the maximum.

Handy tip: The optimal size for your development team is between 5% and 20% of the total number of developers on staff at your outsourcing partner.

Interesting fact: Each of the top 10 IT outsourcing companies have well over 10,000 developers.

Maximize dollar value

Twenty years ago, cost savings was the primary motivating factor for outsourcing software development, often with disastrous results. Outsourcing quickly gained a reputation for being cheap, with get-what-you-pay-for code and service.

Take another look. Outsourcing 2.0 is all about value, and it’s smart. Today, companies of every size outsource software development to reliably implement business-critical software projects within a reasonable amount of time and for a reasonable cost.

Handy tip: Don’t use cost as the only criteria for selecting your outsourcing partner.

Interesting fact: For hourly rates, expect to pay $20-$50 per hour for offshore teams and $50-$100 per hour for onshore development teams.

If you liked the Phoenix Project…

I liked The Phoenix Project and it was an inspiration to coauthor Andy Hilliard and myself as we wrote our own business fable Outsource or Else! How a VP of Software Saved His Company. It tells the story of a software product company where the VP is given the ultimatum to do more with less and deliver faster — or else! Our fictional VP needs the same fast-speed product development skills and expertise as in The Phoenix Project. Smart software outsourcing 2.0 is the answer for both.

 

Source: CIO-Software Development Outsourcing

IT customers slow to embrace outsourced DevOps

While enterprises are experimenting with new DevOps application delivery methods, they’re not yet convinced that their IT service providers can help with the transformation

IT organizations are increasingly interested in adopting DevOps models to deliver applications faster, better and cheaper to the business, but they’re not inclined to look to their IT service providers for help with these efforts.

Fewer than 10 percent of application services agreements in 2014 required DevOps-based delivery, according to research by outsourcing consultancy Everest Group. That’s an indication that enterprises are not yet convinced that their outsourcing partners can play a meaningful role in adopting the new method of delivery, according to Yugal Joshi, practice director at Everest Group.

Move to DevOps model important trend in application services

Everest Group research suggests that moving from an agile development model to DevOps is the single most important trend in application services, but most IT organizations are doing so using their own internal resources rather than leveraging their outsourcing arrangements.

“Buyers are still figuring out DevOps for themselves as it’s not an easy thing to do. Many stakeholders across the value chain need to be aligned to make this work, and in a typical enterprise it is easier said than done,” Joshi says. “However, buyers are indeed experimenting with DevOps internally in projects and proof-of-concepts, though most of this work is handled by the buyers themselves or by leveraging some short-term capacity staff that are order takers rather than change managers.”

Demand for application services consulting is on the rise. Two out of three application services deals inked in 2014 included consulting services, according to Everest Research. And the market for applications services grew by 4 percent in 2014, outpacing the 3.4 percent overall growth of the IT services market, according to Everest’s 2015 annual report on application services.

IT service providers say that they possess the capabilities to drive DevOps transformation with a number of them rebranding their application and infrastructure consultants as “DevOps consultants,” according to Joshi. “Service providers are not really worried, as they are well aware of the glacial pace enterprises normally move to adopt anything new,” Joshi says. “However, as enterprises increase their pace of adoption of new technologies and processes, service providers need to become more alarmed and proactive in assisting the buyers. Unlike earlier times where service providers can rest back for the buyers to reach out to them, they need to be more proactive now.”
The onus is on outsourcing companies to prove their worth in the DevOps space, beginning by demonstrating their end-to-end capabilities. “Given most buyers might be working with providers for specific tasks, service providers need to communicate their capabilities for this piece,” says Joshi. “Moreover, providers need to demonstrate that they are willing to work with different service providers to collaborate and achieve the needed outcome.” Those providers with service integration experience are best positioned to take advantage of DevOps transformation deals.

As for customers, now may be a good time to take a leap of faith and begin experimenting with outsourcing partners on DevOps work for low-risk applications in order to figure out how best to align different service providers. “Earlier concepts of service integration will be very beneficial here,” Joshi says. “Buyers should understand that though a service provider can play an integral part in this journey, the broader change management has to come from within. Service providers should not be tasked to drive this change management as this has a lot of business risk associated [with it].”

Source: CIO.com- IT customers slow to embrace outsourced DevOps by Stephanie Overby

IT customers slow to embrace outsourced DevOps

IT organizations are increasingly interested in adopting DevOps models to deliver applications faster, better and cheaper to the business, but they’re not inclined to look to their IT service providers for help with these efforts.

Fewer than 10 percent of application services agreements in 2014 required DevOps-based delivery, according to research by outsourcing consultancy Everest Group. That’s an indication that enterprises are not yet convinced that their outsourcing partners can play a meaningful role in adopting the new method of delivery, according to Yugal Joshi, practice director at Everest Group.

Move to DevOps model important trend in application services

Everest Group research suggests that moving from an agile development model to DevOps is the single most important trend in application services, but most IT organizations are doing so using their own internal resources rather than leveraging their outsourcing arrangements.

“Buyers are still figuring out DevOps for themselves as it’s not an easy thing to do. Many stakeholders across the value chain need to be aligned to make this work, and in a typical enterprise it is easier said than done,” Joshi says. “However, buyers are indeed experimenting with DevOps internally in projects and proof-of-concepts, though most of this work is handled by the buyers themselves or by leveraging some short-term capacity staff that are order takers rather than change managers.”

Demand for application services consulting is on the rise. Two out of three application services deals inked in 2014 included consulting services, according to Everest Research. And the market for applications services grew by 4 percent in 2014, outpacing the 3.4 percent overall growth of the IT services market, according to Everest’s 2015 annual report on application services.

IT service providers say that they possess the capabilities to drive DevOps transformation with a number of them rebranding their application and infrastructure consultants as “DevOps consultants,” according to Joshi. “Service providers are not really worried, as they are well aware of the glacial pace enterprises normally move to adopt anything new,” Joshi says. “However, as enterprises increase their pace of adoption of new technologies and processes, service providers need to become more alarmed and proactive in assisting the buyers. Unlike earlier times where service providers can rest back for the buyers to reach out to them, they need to be more proactive now.”

The onus is on outsourcing companies to prove their worth in the DevOps space, beginning by demonstrating their end-to-end capabilities. “Given most buyers might be working with providers for specific tasks, service providers need to communicate their capabilities for this piece,” says Joshi. “Moreover, providers need to demonstrate that they are willing to work with different service providers to collaborate and achieve the needed outcome.” Those providers with service integration experience are best positioned to take advantage of DevOps transformation deals.

As for customers, now may be a good time to take a leap of faith and begin experimenting with outsourcing partners on DevOps work for low-risk applications in order to figure out how best to align different service providers. “Earlier concepts of service integration will be very beneficial here,” Joshi says. “Buyers should understand that though a service provider can play an integral part in this journey, the broader change management has to come from within. Service providers should not be tasked to drive this change management as this has a lot of business risk associated [with it].”

Source: channelworld.in-IT customers slow to embrace outsourced DevOps by by Stephanie Overby