IT service automation: A global CIO learns from a millennial

This is the first installment in a series on IT service automation by Pink Elephant expert Jan-Willem Middelburg. The series follows the journey of a fictional global CIO as he realizes that his well-regarded IT organization must radically change the way it delivers IT services. The first chapter below, “Dear CIO, are you ready for the self-service generation?” describes the encounter that sets the CIO on his quest.

It is 9 p.m. and you are staring out the boardroom window across the millions of lights of the city. You are looking back on a day packed with meetings… again. In the morning, you met with the IT steering committee, the risk auditors and the CFO. Your afternoon was filled with your deputy CIOs, each fighting to receive a portion of next year’s budget. It is that time of year again.

As you pack your briefcase and start toward the elevators, you notice the intern still working away. A typical millennial with the latest headphones and a million devices scattered across his desk. The guy was “lucky” to have been chosen out of hundreds of applicants for the summer internship at the CIO Office and, so far, he has been a tremendous asset to your team. The speed and agility with which he can complete complex analyses has frequently surprised you, and you have already decided that you will probably hire him after the summer. You look at your watch and decide it is time to send him home.

You walk over to his office and slowly tap against his screen. The intern lowers his headphones and immediately sits up straight, realizing the global CIO is addressing him. “Tomorrow’s a new day, time to go home,” you hear yourself mutter and the intern immediately looks at his watch, which lights up as he turns his wrist. The intern presses some last buttons on his machine and accompanies you to the elevators.

As you ride the elevator, the silence is uncomfortable, and you start some small talk: “Having a late dinner with your girlfriend tonight?” The intern quickly looks at his phone and replies with a smile: “Dinner should be at my friend’s house in 28 minutes,” he answers. “My girlfriend is staying at her parents this week to finish the paper for her online degree, so we decided it’s better to Airbnb our place for the week.” When the elevator door slides open, you keep wondering what the guy next to you just said.

Right there, at the parking lot in the pouring rain, you realize that you need to make your enterprise ready for the self-service generation. Not just for the young intern who grew up with technology, but for your customers who will also expect the services of your company to be available immediately and with the push of one button.

When you reach the main entrance, you see that it is raining cats and dogs. Your car is parked in one of the executive parking spaces only a few yards away, but you see that even the small distance will get your suit soaked. At the same moment, a small car pulls up at the entrance and the intern opens the door to the back seat. You suddenly realize that the guy already booked an Uber while he was closing his computer upstairs. There’s no thunder as you run for your car, but you feel like you’ve been struck by lightning.

As the intern steps into the Uber, you ask one more question: “Do you still ever call anyone?”

The intern replies: “Just my parents; they are very traditional. Have a great night, boss!”

Right there, at the parking lot in the pouring rain, you realize that you need to make your enterprise ready for the self-service generation. Not just for the young intern who grew up with technology, but for your customers who will also expect the services of your company to be available immediately and with the push of one button.

From service management to IT service automation

The next morning you wake up energized. You order an Uber to take you to work, and whilst you are in the backseat of the car, you reflect on the situation with the intern from last night. Everywhere in the world, new service providers are popping out of the ground with “disruptive” business models. Spotify, Uber, Booking.com and Netflix are some of the main examples that everybody is talking about. They are able to attract massive groups of users and — like the intern — many people like to use these services, because they are instantly available with the click of one app or similar interface.

As you think about this a little more, you wonder what would happen if you could make the services in your organization available in a similar way with IT service automation. What if your employees could select their IT services by themselves and order them as easily as booking a rideshare service? Is provisioning a test server really so much different from booking a driver?

For years, you have worked really hard to achieve operational excellence of all global IT services. Your service catalogue is well-defined and you have consistently managed to reach the targets of your service level agreements (you became CIO for a reason…). You have a very effective and efficient Service Desk that delivers services all over the globe with high satisfaction levels. So, what is the difference between your organization’s services and the services your intern likes to use?

In a traditional service model, the user interacts with the service provider at every step, from request and proposal through paying the invoice and sending feedback. In the automated service provider model, the self-service portal — a technology layer — automates many or all of the steps.

As your Uber drives into the parking lot of your office, and your driver swipes that he has completed his ride, you suddenly realize the difference: The services your organization offers are control-oriented and frequently include manual steps. The services Spotify, Uber, Booking.com and Netflix are offering are user-oriented and completely automated.

Source: searchcio.techtarget.com-IT service automation: A global CIO learns from a millennial

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The Robots are Coming – Should You Fear or Welcome Them

How does your enterprise compare with peers?

A few weeks back, we opened our Robotic Process Automation (RPA) Pinnacle Model study to enterprises to compare their RPA adoption performances head-to-head. Everest Group Pinnacle ModelTM assessments are unique in that they correlate quantified outcomes and capabilities with a special spotlight on the Pinnacle Enterprises that are outperforming their peers. As part of the study process, we also interview select participants to gather qualitative information about these same enterprises.

Having completed a number of these interviews and looking at some of the early tabulations from those have completed the RPA adoption survey, I’m sharing some of my early thoughts below.

Four thoughts on our RPA Pinnacle Enterprise survey results

  • The robots are truly coming, but the fears about the impact on jobs is way overblown – it is clear from our conversations that RPA is going to have an impact in many different parts of the organization, including both front office and back office, but the number of jobs being impacted is not going to be the primary value proposition. Yes, cost take out will be part of the equation, but it is highly likely it will impact slices of jobs and/or departments that will allow for those employees to be transitioned to higher-value tasks.
  • Improving the job for employees – One of the clear messages that we have heard so far is that employees are embracing RPA. In fact, the branding of these initiatives is about getting rid of the worst tasks of their current jobs and includes names like “Smart Automation” and “We Innovate.” In fact, many of these employees are already implementing their own home automations like Nest, Alexa, Google, Rachio, etc. and are becoming quite comfortable with these quality of life improvements automations. One of the enterprises we spoke with actually talked about seeing improvements in their employee retention rates when they were included in these initiatives and allowed to improve their own jobs. However, change management has not been “easy,” and companies have adopted various ways to create awareness about the benefits of RPA and how employees can use it to be more effective in their jobs. Some of the examples of approaches include workshops, training programs, newsletters, project of the year, and hackathons.
  • The real skirmish is between the business units and IT for ownership – one of the interesting aspects of this analysis is to see where the study participants reside in their organizations. In the conversations, it becomes apparent the business is the one driving the conversation and IT has been the reluctant partner. But I got the sense this was changing pretty quickly, and IT was beginning to see the light that they have to be part of these implementations for a variety of reasons. Also, organizations have internally gone through a debate as to whether to approach this is an IT project or a business process redesign. We will be interested in hearing how your organization is thinking about this. Participate in the study.
  • We are just getting started – we can see it in the data and with our conversations, enterprises are running multiple RPA initiatives and projects are spread across RPA implementation stages. At least 65% of respondents are in the process of scaling up their RPA efforts or running steady-state automations. However, the majority of enterprises are still in their rookie year when it comes to setting up RPA CoEs (or expanding existing automation CoEs). The implications is that the initial proof of concepts projects are seeing enough promise that formal teams are being stood up to begin the scaling process.

Source:  everestgrp.com-The Robots are Coming – Should You Fear or Welcome Them

Robotic Process Automation changing the spectrum of business processing, to witness a CAGR of 33.3%

The global robotic process automation market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 33.3%during this year up to 2023 to reach 2,821.0 USD by 2023. Factors propelling the growth of robotic process automation market include increasing adoption of RPA technology for enterprise scale deployments, implementation at broader scale enabling easy implementation and high return on investment. The report segments the robotic process automation market by solution (interaction solution, automated solution (business process, industry specific, infrastructure automation, others), decision support and management solution) by Process (rule based and knowledge based), by Type (software tools and services), by Application Services (BFSI, healthcare and life sciences, IT & telecom, transaction intelligence, consumer services, others), and by region (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Rest of the world (ROW)). The report studies the global robotic process automation market over the forecast period (2017-2023).

Robotic process automation technology involves application of smart software to perform high-volume, repeatable tasks such as data processing, entry and integration by reducing humans intervention offering quality, reduced time thus, increasing profit margin. Unlike traditional application processing software, robotic automation offers a platform easing the business processes.

Browse full research report with TOC on “Global Robotic Process Automation Market Outlook, Trend and Opportunity Analysis, Competitive Insights, Actionable Segmentation & Forecast 2023”

Key findings from global robotic process automation market

  • The automated solution is accounted to hold for largest share of robotic process automation market in 2016. Further, the infrastructure automation is expected to register high growth rate on account of increasing implementation of RPA technology in shared service organizations such as BPOs
  • Banking financial services and insurance (BFSI) application services is expected to grow at highest rate. The BFSI sector is in continuous effort to reduce the operation cost and increasing profit margins increasing the adoption rate of RPA technology
  • Geographically, North America is the largest market adopting RPA technology in the small and large scale businesses. The growth in the region is primarily due to presence of large players and continuous development of the RPA technology over the past few years
  • The adoption of RPA technology in Asia-Pacific region is set to register high CAGR over the forecast period. The increasing adoption and spending in healthcare, automotive and retail services drives the demand for the implementation of RPA in the region
  • Key players in robotic process automation Market are Peg systems Inc., Blue Prism PLC, Verint System Inc., Xerox Corporation, IBM, Arago Us, Inc., Accenture, Thoughtonomy Ltd., Ipsoft, Inc., Soft motive Ltd. among others.

Robotic Process automation – Alternate to outsourcing

RPA being an emerging technology is being adopted across various business processes across the globe. Robotics process automation (RPA) is a further step to the evolution of business process outsourcing. The technology enables to reduce the cost of operations by reducing requirement of employees to perform high volume rule based task. RPA technology offers companies an alternative to outsourcing and has high impact on reduced cost, making organizations to adopt the technology at high rate and broader scale across the globe.

Robotic Process automation Market – Regional Insight

North America region held the major market share in robotics process automation market. The growth in the region is attributed to adoption of RPA technology at broader scale. Further, the presence of major players in the region propels the growth for the robotics process automation implementation. The implementation of RPA software by small and medium enterprises at higher rate led to an increasing market share in the region. The implementation of RPA software and tools in BFSI sector is increasing rapidly in U.S. increasing the market size in the region. The greater adoption by financial, healthcare, human resource and banking sector drives the growth of RPA market in Asia-Pacific region. Further, Robotic Process Automation (RPA) software continues to grow significantly in the Asia-Pacific region, driven by trend opted by enterprises to create more of digital workforce in order to reduce the cost.

About Energias Market Research

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With a wide range of expertise from various industrial sectors and more than 50 industries that include energy, chemical and materials, information communication technology, semiconductor industries, healthcare and daily consumer goods, etc. We strive to provide our clients with a one-stop solution for all research and consulting needs.

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Source: globenewswire.com – Robotic Process Automation changing the spectrum of business processing, to witness a CAGR of 33.3%

What do digital, automation and outsourcing have in common?

Recently a lot has been said and written about two prominent trends: digital and automation. However little has been discussed about the commonalities between these prominent trends and the outsourcing industry.

Digital and automation are two of the most prominent trends influencing the outsourcing industry.

Below are some ideas and considerations organizations may wish to consider before placing emphasis on one versus the other:

  • The organization’s strategy sets the direction: Having a clear understanding of the organization’s strategy and goals will directly determine the linkage between digital, automation and outsourcing. As simplistic as it sounds, a balance between these can be hard to achieve. A good way to approach this is to think digital as the environment, automation as an enabler and outsourcing as a way to deliver services. As part of this approach, organizations will also require higher emphasis in other important pillars such as governance, risk and internal staff skills.
  • Digital is a reality organizations shall not ignore: Service providers are supporting the digital transformation by and large, as it does increase their portfolio of services and revenue. For organizations, the implications of a digital environment to services, if well implemented, tend to be positive. The biggest challenge lies on the organization’s community and clientele. For example, let’s think about the recent trends in retail banking and the opportunities digital will continue to bring with direct positive impact on operational costs. Other industries that may benefit from digital are insurance and telecom, as those have usually higher volume of services and effort associated with their service delivery models. A recent article released by The Economist magazine titled “Tech pundits’ tenuous but intriguing prognostications about 2016 and beyond” provided some mind bogging predictions, including the following: “By 2020, predicts IDC, a third of today’s IT companies will no longer exist in their current form, swallowed up in a wave of mergers and takeovers. And although demand for cloud computing will soar, many smaller contenders will fall by the wayside. Within five years the market will be dominated by perhaps half a dozen global giants, from American ones such as Amazon and Microsoft to Chinese ones like Alibaba.”
  • Automation is evolving rapidly: There is no doubt automation will continue to grow and evolve over the next few years. As service providers opt to automate vs. labor in, commodity services are already in high demand to be transformed through automation. In my latest CIO article I wrote about BPO being renamed as BPA – more can be found by clicking here. In a nutshell, the benefits associated with automated services can help organizations to realize value in a much faster and effective way – while services providers minimize their existing labor risks.       Another important factor to consider is that machines now can “learn to execute” with little guidance and oversight from humans. A very interesting article published by Shivon Zillis provided a very insightful picture of the current state of machine Intelligence across different industries:
    Shivon Zillis<p>Machine Intelligence 2.0</p>
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    Shivon Zillis

    Machine Intelligence 2.0
  • Manage the organizational changes associated with these trends: It is common to see the excitement big transformational trends such as digital and automation bring to an organization. For those who live and breathe change, this might be heaven. For others, this can be a very stressful time in which future is somewhat unclear. As such, organizations should not underestimate the level of effort required to manage changes associated with these trends. The key here is to, from internal clients to service providers and the organizations clientele, monitor and manage changes appropriately so that the organization’s strategy can be adjusted accordingly.
  • The importance of governance and risk management should not be understated: With multi-sourcing becoming more evident and increased regulatory pressures, organizations will continue to need to invest heavily on appropriate governance and risk management practices. Notwithstanding the fact automation and digital are new trends, there is a bit of learning curve for both organizations and services providers taking place. The fact of the matter is that, when determining value for money, organizations should factor in the service providers ability to deliver services while complying with the set organizations’ governance and risk protocols for their relationship. At the same time, organizations shall be able to effectively assess their risk appetite, protocols and reputation so that the desired outcomes can be realized. What organizations should not compromise is their ability to comply with their respective regulatory requirements, as this can have a significant impact to the organizations’ reputation and bottom line.
  • The importance to invest on the organizations staff skills: While organizations invest to enable digital and automation, they should also invest on their internal staff skills and capabilities required to effectively manage and support their transformation. Many times there is a consent this should be considered a priority, however it usually tends to get lost – as it is hard to execute any type of business transformation. If we take into account the organization’s team as a critical element for success, it is imperative that internal staff have the right skills and knowledge to effectively execute their roles going forward. As much as learning while executing is possible, organizations should not place themselves in situations that could represent a higher than normal level of risks or with significant impacts to their clientele. 

The conclusion: This is going to be an exciting year for the outsourcing industry, with great opportunities for buyers and services providers to collaborate and contribute on how to best enable their digital environment, use automation as an enabler to promote services and continue to use outsourcing as a way to obtain and deliver services. Stay put.

Source: cio.com- What do digital, automation and outsourcing have in common?

Predictions, Redactions

At their annual Gartner Symposium event in Orlando yesterday, Peter Sondergaard predicted:

“AI will be a net job creator starting in 2020”

To that, Jason Hiner at TechRepublic snarkily commented

“Gartner’s research chief couldn’t have opened the company’s flagship conference with a more astounding proclamation if he had claimed that next year’s event would be held on the International Space Station and Gartner was offering free rides.”

Actually, I agree with Peter – I wrote  a whole book, Silicon Collar which looks at a century of automation and how humans go through panic attacks every couple of decades about automation and impact on jobs. Automation tends to target tasks, not complete jobs. In general, it transforms jobs, not destroy them. And societies have “circuit breakers” which slow down rapid mass adoption of automation technology as I wrote here.

What I would I have liked to hear from Peter was “we were too pessimistic just 3 years ago”, when he said from the same podium

“Gartner predicts one in three jobs will be converted to software, robots and smart machines by 2025…New digital businesses require less labor; machines will make sense of data faster than humans can. By 2018, digital business will require 50% fewer business process workers.”

And I would liked him to say “we really fxxked up” when we predicted that by next year (2018)

  • 20 percent of business content will be authored by machines.
  • more than 3 million workers globally will be supervised by a “robo-boss.”
  • 45 percent of the fastest-growing companies will have fewer employees than instances of smart machines.

In contrast, Oracle Co-CEO Mark Hurd shared with the OpenWorld audience a few hours later some of the “mean tweets” as he called it about some of the predictions he has been making about the cloud market.

Later in a Q&A, I joked with Mark that as an industry analyst he would have the luxury of hedging and assigning a probability to his predictions and then never publicly having to audit or redact his predictions.

Source: enterpriseirregulars-Predictions, Redactions

No, Robots Should Not Be Taxed

Proposals to tax robots have been debated by serious folks recently. The European Union considered but ultimately rejected the idea of taxing firms that use robots. And last week Quartz published an interview with Bill Gates in which he argues for a robot tax. These proposals follow a spate of recent articles on robots and automation, some of which argue there will be large job losses from robots and automation. These articles include one in the New Yorker, which profiled books by Martin Ford, Jerry Kaplan, Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, and David Autor’s article on workplace automation in Journal of Economic Perspectives, among others.

There’s no question that the potential increase in robots and automation requires policy makers to rethink fiscal policy for the 21stcentury (and other policy as well, such as education and retraining policy). But, based on the data we currently have, a tax on robots would be bad policy. Robot taxes would dissuade firms from investing in robots, which would lower economic growth, and, to the extent that robots complement labor in some cases, would lead to less hiring and lower wage growth.

What Is A Robot?

There are a number of problems with the idea of taxing robots. The first problem is definitional. In a manufacturing context, a robot typically refers to a robotic arm. As defined by ISO 8373, an industrial robot is an “automatically controlled, reprogrammable, multipurpose manipulator programmable in three or more axes, which may be either fixed in place or mobile for use in industrial automation applications.” But people also use the term “robot” to refer to software algorithms, including Amazon’s Alexa and Apple’s Siri, and many of us now routinely interact with chatbots, which have replaced human operators.

When we say we want to tax robots, do we want to tax all types of robots, including software robots and other forms of automation, or just robot arms? If we confine our definition of robot to a robot arm, then the robot tax ends up being a tax borne primarily by the manufacturing sector, and not by other sectors of the economy that will likely invest heavily in automation, including autonomous vehicles in trucking and transport, smart conveyor belts in warehouses, electronic checkouts in retail, etc. Manufacturing comprises about 9% of the U.S. economy on average, but up to 15% of employment in some states. Taxing investment in a handful of states based on an arbitrary definition of what does or does not comprise a “robot” does not seem to be good policy.

Robots Increase Economic Growth

Even if there were good ways to define a robot, there are good reasons not to tax the use of robots and automation. The Council of Economic Advisers’ 2016 Economic Report of the President cited research showing that robots can boost gross domestic product growth by 10% and labor productivity growth by over 15%, numbers similar to the impact of steam engines on British labor productivity growth in the 19thCentury.

Moreover, robots are complements to labor, not substitutes for labor, in many cases. For example, Amazon has been increasing the number of robots it uses in its fulfillment centers, but Amazon has also been increasing the number of humans it employs in its fulfillment centers. More broadly, as highlighted elsewhere, we need to do a better job collecting data on robots and how they are being used so that we can understand conditions under which robots are substitutes or complements. Therefore a robot tax would make it harder to achieve productivity growth and, to the extent that robots are complements to labor, a robot tax may perversely lead to fewer rather than more jobs.

Instead, Consider Proven Policies Such As EITC

Instead of a robot tax, policy makers should consider other policy options in response to automation. One idea with bipartisan support is to expand the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which provides tax credits to working individuals who meet certain income thresholds, to a larger set of the population. If a person loses a job due to automation, globalization, or any other reason, the opportunity to benefit from the EITC provides an incentive to find another job. Research shows there are a number of other benefits of the EITC, including childhood development and poverty reduction.

Of course, new skills may be necessary for a new job, which is why vocational training and re-training programs are important. The United States spends less than 0.05% of its GDP on vocational training—less than most other OECD countries, a tenth of what Finland and Denmark spend, and a fifth of what Germany spends—and the U.S. number has been declining for the past couple of decades. At a minimum, funding for job training should be increased, and there are a range of options for how the training can be delivered and administered.

One recent idea that has gained popularity is a universal basic income (UBI). While UBI schemes vary in their specifics, the basic idea is to replace existing safety net programs with a single, unconditional cash transfer. While the apparent simplicity of a UBI scheme is appealing, a number of drawbacks have been noted, including that it does not reward work or provide the training needed to find higher paying jobs, and, depending on how it is structured, may leave many people worse off than they are today, particularly those at the lower end of the income distribution who currently rely on existing safety nets. Nevertheless, pilot studies on basic income schemes have been started, including in Finland, the Netherlands and Oakland, CA. These experiments will provide valuable data and, ultimately, insights for policy makers.

Thus, despite the legitimate concerns of its proponents, there are good reasons why there should not be a tax on robots. But Bill Gates is right to suggest the need for a larger debate about appropriate policies for addressing automation.

Source: forbes.com-No, Robots Should Not Be Taxed

Robotic Process Automation Market Key Players

Market Highlights

Global Robotic Process Automation Market is growing rapidly. High development in the field of technology, need of efficiency and automation in industry, changing government norms towards the manual operation works in the industry are some of the key drivers for the market of robotic process automation.

The Robotic Process Automation is a key component of business process management and has proven exponentially beneficial to the companies. Easy learning and flexibility of changing the tasks of robots of process is the key feature which is helping in the wide adoption of RPA. Once the RPA is trained and is molded into the desired work environment, it has been seen that the RPA has performed tremendously.

The global RPA market is expected to grow at USD ~7 billion by the end of year 2022 with ~57% of CAGR.

Taste the market data and market information presented through more than 30 market data tables and figures spread over 110 numbers of pages of the project report. Avail the in-depth table of content TOC & market synopsis onThe Robotic Process Automation Market Research Report -Forecast to 2022

Major Key Players

  • Automation Anywhere (France)
  • Blue Prism (U.K.)
  • OpenSpan (U.S.)
  • Celaton (U.S.)
  • Exilant (India)
  • OpenConnect Systems Incorporated (U.S.)
  • Verint Systems (U.S.)
  • Cognizant (U.S.)
  • Infosys Limited (India)
  • Atos Corporation (France)

Intended Audience

  • Technology Providers
  • Robots Manufacturing Companies
  • Software distributors
  • Software developing companies
  • Banking Industry
  • Research Institutes

Segments:

The Global market of RPA is segmented on the basis of Organization Size and Industries. By organization size, the market has been segmented into SMEs and large enterprises where by industries the market consist deep study of segments- BFSI, Manufacturing, IT and Retail among others.

Market Research Analysis:

MRFR analysis shows that North America is dominating the market of RPA in the year 2016. High development in the IT industry and growing banking sector is driving the market in North America. Also, presence of developed countries in this region gives North America a competitive advantage over other countries. Europe is expected to stand as second biggest market due to the growing automotive and Healthcare industry in Germany and Italy. Asia-Pacific is expected to emerge as fastest growing market as China, South Korea and Japan are few of the biggest manufacturing driven economies. High demand of consumer electronic products in this region is also pushing the manufacturers to adopt RPA in the process.

Browse Full Report Details @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/robotic-process-automation-market-2209

Source: newsmaker.com.au-Robotic Process Automation Market Key Players